Members Area Logout

Where can you buy research papers?

A research paper you can purchase from your local bookstore is an intricate procedure of writing an academic research. This involves the analysis and interpretation as well as the evaluation of the findings. Although there are many styles, they all follow the similar structure. The introduction will be the most important portion of your assignment. This paragraph will contain your thesis statement. The body of the assignment will then contain details of the study and the conclusion. If your assignment is on a focus-page, then that will be used to display your results.

It is beneficial to know the kind of work you’ll be doing before you purchase research papers. For instance, certain college research papers require a higher amount of research than others. Some require extensive literature reviews while others require only fieldwork. Surveys are a component of the wider field of academic writing. Whatever kind of task you’ll be working on there will be a set of components you’ll need to succeed, including the following.

Before you buy research papers, you need to write a hypothesis statement or a statement about your purpose. This will form the basis of your research. The statement of purpose will usually include a rationale for why you’re doing your research and what you intend to accomplish, and what steps you intend to take to achieve your goals. The blueprint for your academic project is your thesis statement. It will give a thorough outline of the particulars of your project. You will want to use as many of your primary sources as you can to strengthen and support your theory.

Introduction and executive summary are essential parts of a research paper. It will highlight the key elements of the paper and provide the reader a good idea of what you intend to do with the paper. Introductions are also essential because it allows you grab the attention of the reader and encourages them to read your entire paper. A good introduction is the best place to start any research paper. After the introduction, you can talk about your topic in order to answer any questions readers may have and involve readers in the essay.

The next step is to choose your topic, and then write your thesis statement or statement of purpose. When choosing your topic , you should consider your audience and the general theme of your writing. For instance, if you are writing an essay on child development you would not be able to write on art or philosophy unless you are interested in researching areas of child development. Your thesis statement can aid you in choosing the right topic for your essay.

After you have selected the topic you want to write about and have written your thesis statement, you are now able to begin writing the rest of your paper. Some writers prefer to choose topics that interest them, while others prefer to write about their passions. It is important for professional writers to choose topics they are interested in and which will allow them to advance their education by acquiring new knowledge. The most popular topics for professional writers include law, business, computers, education, engineering, health, history marketing, political science technology, spirituality, and many other areas. It is recommended to search for research papers that are suitable for professional writing in these areas including law health, computer science technology, education and law.

You should be sure that you have the proper guidelines for professional writing prior to purchasing research papers. Some colleges or publishers will require specific things when you pay for research papers. Some publishers or colleges will require you to use primary sources such as universities and museums. Based on the type of paper you’ll need to do additional research beyond the library or primary source.

As you can see from this article there are many things to consider when paying for research papers. To discover the best websites to purchase research papers from it is essential that you know what to look for, and which websites provide the best rates. You may need to use web outline for essay multiple sites if you plan on pursuing your research topics in the academic field. If, however, you are just writing papers for fun or for school, you may not require more than one site. Your best option will be to purchase your papers from websites that offer more than one offering to ensure that you’re able to find the best prices on the papers that you need.

FCC Statement on Arrests and Search Involving Apple Daily

The Foreign Correspondents’ Club, Hong Kong is concerned over the arrest of five Apple Daily executives, including its editor-in-chief Ryan Law and deputy chief editor.

According to the Hong Kong police and media reports, the five were detained on suspicion of conspiracy to collude with foreign forces under the National Security Law and were undergoing questioning.

The FCC notes that the Hong Kong police’s search of the Apple Daily premises took place under a warrant “covering the power of searching and seizure of journalistic materials.” Press reports indicate that police searched journalists’ notes and files and accessed their computers.

We are not pronouncing on the legalities of the situation or today’s actions. However the Foreign Correspondents’ Club is concerned that this latest action will serve to intimidate independent media in Hong Kong and will cast a chill over the free press, protected under the Basic Law.

Happy Month’s Day 2021

A test post

This is a post for a test notification

It’s farewell and bon voyage to Correspondent editor, Sue Brattle

The Foreign Correspondents’ Club bids farewell to Sue Brattle, a longtime member and outgoing editor of The Correspondent, as she embarks on a new chapter. Before she leaves Hong Kong, we asked her to reflect on her time helming the magazine.

Q: What first drew you to the position of editor of The Correspondent?

A: I was a reader of the magazine and was ghost-writing a book when I saw the contract advertised. I had flexible working hours, so thought I’d apply for the job – and got it! My thanks to Kate Whitehead and Adam White who interviewed me, and for being so supportive in my first year. I’m sure the new editor, Kate Springer, who has my very best wishes, will equally get terrific support from the current Communications Committee.

Q: What are you proudest of during your time as editor?

A: Definitely the protest issue of October 2019. By then the protests had become part of our landscape in Hong Kong, and I wanted to emphasise the human interest stories behind the media coverage. I approached around 25 members of the media and was bowled over by the response. I asked for personal reflections, as apolitical as possible, and that’s what I got. Some of the 20 or so pieces genuinely moved me, and I think it made for a strong issue of the magazine.

Q: What were the key challenges you faced while in this role?

A: Making the magazine timely, while being quarterly. I always tried to commission early in the three-month cycle, but gave writers and photographers as much leeway with deadlines as possible. I did most of the magazine in the three weeks before going to press, and the cover story and president’s message in the last hour or so. Also, I’d love for the Comms Committee to meet in the evening rather than at lunchtime, so members had more time to chew over ideas instead of needing to rush back to work.

Q: What are some of the most memorable stories you commissioned and worked on with reporters? 

I loved working with the students who wrote for the second protest issue, January 2020, and the coronavirus issue of April 2020. Their care and enthusiasm should be bottled! There are a few stars of the future among them. It was always a pleasure to work with journalists in the club who know Hong Kong inside out and can bring it alive. As every editor knows, there’s nothing like an idea landing in your inbox out of the blue from someone you can trust will deliver it on time. Oh, I also loved the club’s annual Journalism Conference and eventually had a team of reporters covering it.

It was always a pleasure to work with journalists in the club who know Hong Kong inside out and can bring it alive.

Q: What do you plan to do after leaving Hong Kong? 

A: Well, I’m sure you can hear the gods laughing at our plans … what a time to be on the move. Plan A was to go home to the UK, slowly, as an extended holiday. You never know, we may still manage that. Then we’ll sort out our house, which has had tenants for 14 years while we’ve been working abroad, and organise our next adventure. My husband and I launched a travel blog, Afaranwide.com, 18 months ago, and we’ll work on that wherever we are.

Q: What will you miss about Hong Kong?

A: The list is endless, but I really don’t want to lose the view from our balcony in Discovery Bay. The steady comings and goings of the ferry make me feel all’s well, whatever the reality is! And looking out onto the hills opposite us is definitely good for the soul. I doubt I’ll ever have such a privileged view again.

Sue Brattle is leaving Hong Kong for a move back to the U.K. Sue Brattle is leaving Hong Kong for a move back to the U.K.

ON ASSIGNMENT, THE FCC’S 2019 CHARITY FUNDRAISER – TICKETS ON SALE NOW

Go “On Assignment” and party all night like yesteryear’s correspondents at the 2019 FCC Charity Fundraiser. The evening will include international buffets, drinks, entertainment, live bands and a good dose of nostalgia and fun.

Chris Polanco, Don’t Panic, Sybil Thomas, Crimes Against Pop and DJ Perez will be playing.

Tickets are HK $888 for members and $1,088 for their guests, available at the Front Office or by emailing [email protected].

The fundraiser will benefit Keeping Kids in Kindergarten, a local charity helping the young children of refugees and asylum-seekers in Hong Kong. Read more about them in The Correspondent: https://www.fcchk.org/correspondent/fcc-adopts-charity-that-helps-asylum-seekers-get-their-children-into-kindergarten/

Raffle tickets are now available at the Front Office.

Stay tuned for updates on raffle tickets and an online auction featuring an exciting range of items to bid on.

 

Wall Exhibition- Looking Back: Hong Kong 1967 Riots

THE FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS’ CLUB, HONG KONG
Wall Exhibition
Looking Back: Hong Kong 1967 Riots
Photos Provided Courtesy of
Hong Kong Information Services Department,
SCMP, Hugh Van Es
Venue: Main Bar
Exhibition dates: April 21 – May 14, 2017
Non-members are welcome from 10am-12 noon & 3pm-5:30pm daily.
Please feel free to register at the Concierge before visiting.
The exhibition is located at Main Bar
No entry to anyone aged under 18 years or inappropriately dressed (e.g. no singlets)
Address: North Block, 2 Lower Albert Road, Central, Hong Kong
Tel: 2521 1511

 

Hello word

Hello word

Income Statement – January 2018

Income Statement – January 2018

Harassment of journalists in China: reporters covering Xinjiang prevented from conducting interviews

Here are the latest reports of harassment against journalists covering events in China, courtesy of our colleagues at the FCC China.

Axel Dorloff, ARD German Radio. Photo: Twitter Axel Dorloff, ARD German Radio. Photo: Twitter

INCIDENT REPORT – submitted December 2017

By Axel Dorloff, ARD German Radio.

We went to Xinjian Cun on Monday, December 11. After about 20 minutes of interviews and talking to different people and migrant workers (who all were very open and willing to talk) a group of about 15 to 20 “Te Qin” security guys approached us and asked us to leave. We would have no sufficient permission to do those interviews. We insisted that in this case we wouldn’t need that and tried to go on with our work. But they repeatedly asked us to stop our interviews and wouldn’t leave us alone until we did that. We finally went to the car and headed to the neighbouring village to go on there.

 

 

INCIDENT REPORT – submitted December 2017

By Macarena Vidal, El País.

When we went to Daxin, we had no problem at the beginning and the police would only look on while we worked. But after a few interviews, another policeman arrived and told us to go with him to the station “to receive a briefing”. Needless to say, we never received such briefing. At least we did not have to stay there for very long. After about 15-20 minutes a girl arrived, said that a press conference “may be arranged in the future”, told us to contact the Beijing city information office and drove us to where our car was waiting, making clear that we should leave. They took copies of our press cards, but so far we have not been told off or summoned by anyone.

INCIDENT REPORT – submitted December 2017

By a correspondent with an American news organisation.

Two of us were detained back in early November in Xinjiang, lasting from approx. 6pm to 5am. We were told the typical line: reporting in the area required prior permission according to law. We pointed out that there exists no such Chinese law, and for the past decade or so foreign journalists have been free to travel unannounced outside the TAR. They basically retorted that that’s not applicable in Xinjiang or in their local jurisdiction due to the security situation.

We had booked train tickets out of town that night at 11pm but they refused to let us go. They requested to see our photos and we refused but after some negotiation they backed down and we didn’t hand them over. We called the foreign ministry several times starting at around midnight, and for a few hours they seemed to try their best to negotiate with the local public security and propaganda officials on our behalf. We were moved from the public security department to a local hotel lobby at 1am, where interrogation and a lot of waiting continued. We were released at 5am after they interrogated us about the sequence of events for the fourth time and took a written record which both parties signed as per common procedure. They refused to let us take a picture of it but we recorded a reporter reading it over the phone to the bureau chief in Beijing.

We boarded a train at around 5:30am. Later that day after we landed in a different city we were met with (and in my case physically grabbed by) propaganda officials outside an airport. We were closely followed for a day and that night, we were told that every hotel that could take foreigners were booked even though we saw multiple people check into empty rooms. The local entry-exit bureau also refused to make an exception for us to stay at a lower-grade hotel, leading us to wonder if it was a coordinated attempt to deny us lodging. Local officials insisted it was not. We were not permitted to fall asleep by a security guard but caught a few winks on two couches in a hotel lobby while local and prefectural propaganda officials took turns watching us from a third couch. One of the officials, who is Uighur, noted that “sometimes I am denied a hotel room when I’m traveling because I’m Uighur, but that’s how it is and I don’t complain.” We left before dawn for a sleeper train and roused from our sleep by train staff who were instructed to monitor us, which they did via walkie talkies whenever we moved through train cars or prepared to disembark.

We were detained several more times the rest of the trip; I was at one point pursued by three officials on foot. I’ve previously been followed, pursued and interrogated for even longer in China, but this Xinjiang trip was by far the worst experience. The authorities were relentless in pursuing us and obstructing our work.

INCIDENT REPORT – submitted December 2017

By a correspondent from a western media outlet.

A correspondent from a western media outlet was called into the Foreign Ministry to discuss the reporter’s coverage of the evictions issue. They were told that while it was preferred that no more stories were done on this subject if there were to be any more they should be balanced and include the government’s perspective. The correspondent told them that repeated attempts to interview a Beijing government representative were declined by the government. The reporter was warned to guard against “Chinese public opinion” hardening against their stories however the meeting was friendly. The same correspondent (along with a Chinese staff member) were also called into the Exit Entry Police to discuss their coverage of the evictions issue. The police interviewed the two separately and recorded the interviews on video camera. The reporter was told they’d done nothing wrong but asked many questions about the basis for this coverage. It was a lengthy, polite discussion. The tone was friendly and the police said they merely wanted to better understand the situation. At one stage the officers asked if the reporter had sought the permission of local village officials to enter the eviction areas, in the same way that the managers of a danwei should approve an employee being interviewed. The journalist said that as this was a public space such permission did not seem necessary. The police at no stage specifically insisted that such permission was required under Chinese law.

We measure site performance with cookies to improve performance.