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Club Online Zoom Event: Divorce, Decoupling or Conflict? Sino-American Relations and the New Cold War

ONLINE ZOOM EVENT
Divorce, Decoupling or Conflict?
Sino-American Relations and the New Cold War
Wednesday, August 12, 2020
8:00pm HKT on Zoom
 

Just a decade ago, China watchers and economists coined the phrase “Chimerica” to describe the intertwined relationship between the U.S. and China, the world’s two largest economies. Now Washington and Beijing are mired in an escalating series of clashes over imbalanced trade, the expulsions of journalists, human rights in Xinjiang and political freedoms and autonomy in Hong Kong, among other issues. Relations between the two superpowers today seem to be at the lowest point since President Nixon’s historic visit to China nearly a half century ago. An expert panel will discuss whether the fraying Sino-American bilateral relationship is heading toward a conscious decoupling, a full-blown divorce or even a potential military clash.
Panelists include:

Lingling Wei is an award-winning senior China correspondent, who was based at the Wall Street Journal’s Beijing bureau from 2011 until China expelled Journal reporters in 2020. Hailing from a farm province in southeastern China, she came of age as a journalist in New York and returned to China in early 2011. She focuses on the intersection of Chinese politics and the economy. She is co-author, with Bob Davis, of the new book, “Superpower Showdown; How the Battle Between Trump and Xi Threatens a New Cold War”.
Mary E. Gallagher, a professor at The University of Michigan, has been director of the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies since 2008, and was in July was appointed director of the university’s International Institute. She received her PhD from Princeton University, was a foreign student in China in 1989 at Nanjing University andtaught at the Foreign Affairs College in Beijing from 1996-97. She was a Fulbright Research Scholar from 2003-04 at East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, China. In 2012-13, she was a visiting professor at the Koguan School of Law at Shanghai Jiaotong University. She is the author of a number of books and articles on China.
Bonnie Glaser is a senior adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where she works on issues related to Chinese foreign and security policy. She is also a nonresident fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, and a senior associate with the Pacific Forum. From 2008 to 2015, she was a senior adviser with the Freeman Chair in China Studies, and from 2003 to mid-2008, she was a senior associate in the CSIS International Security Program. Prior to joining CSIS, she served as a consultant for U.S. government offices, including the Departments of Defense and State. She has written extensively on Chinese foreign and security policy.
Moderator: Keith Richburg, FCC Correspondent Governor Member and Director of the Journalism and Media Studies Centre, The University of Hong Kong. He was formerly the Bureau Chief in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong for The Washington Post.
This is one in a series of FCC panel discussion focusing on U.S.-China relations and the New Cold War, and we will be hosting more such events in the coming weeks.

 

 

Speaker: Lingling Wei, Mary E. Gallagher, Bonnie Glaser,