Members Area

Notice to members re COVID-19

Dear Members:

In light of recent cases in Central, the Club’s priority is to maintain a safe and healthy environment for staff, members and guests. Out of an abundance of caution, we would like to ask that any Member who is living with or has been in close contact with a person issued with a government compulsory testing order, to obtain a Covid test and refrain from using the Club facilities until they have received a negative result. For the latest list of restricted premises, please refer to the Government Gazette at www.gld.gov.hk/egazette/english/gazette/toc.php

In keeping with government requirements, all members and guests are required to scan the QR code displayed at the entrance of the club with the “LeaveHomeSafe” app, or to register their personal details at the front desk when checking in.
For more information please contact the Club via email [email protected] or phone 2521 1511.
We would like to thank you for your understanding and support during these special times.

FCC Minimum Spend

Dear Members:

Whilst the FCC has continued to operate despite the COVID-19 related restrictions, the Board is aware that some members have not been able to fully utilise their membership in recent months. In consideration of this, it has been agreed that the minimum spend requirement which would normally be charged to members at the end of March will be rolled over for three months and will now appear on members’ June accounts. The facility to purchase vouchers for later use will also continue to be available. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all members for their continued support of the FCC.

15 March 2021

Notice to members re COVID-19

Notice to members re COVID-19

Dear Members:

In light of recent cases in Central, the Club’s priority is to maintain a safe and healthy environment for staff, members and guests. Out of an abundance of caution, we would like to ask that any Member who is living with or has been in close contact with a person issued with a government compulsory testing order, to obtain a Covid test and refrain from using the Club facilities until they have received a negative result. For the latest list of restricted premises, please refer to the Government Gazette at https://www.gld.gov.hk/egazette/english/gazette/toc.php

In keeping with government requirements, all members and guests are required to scan the QR code displayed at the entrance of the club with the “LeaveHomeSafe” app, or to register their personal details at the front desk when checking in.
For more information please contact the Club via email [email protected] or phone 2521 1511.
We would like to thank you for your understanding and support during these special times.
    

 

 

FCC Minimum Spend

FCC Minimum Spend

Dear Members:

Whilst the FCC has continued to operate despite the COVID-19 related restrictions, the Board is aware that some members have not been able to fully utilise their membership in recent months. In consideration of this, it has been agreed that the minimum spend requirement which would normally be charged to members at the end of March will be rolled over for three months and will now appear on members’ June accounts. The facility to purchase vouchers for later use will also continue to be available. We would like to take this opportunity to thank all members for their continued support of the FCC.

15 March 2021

 

How Three Women Correspondents Changed Modern War Reporting


FCC First Vice President Eric Wishart speaks to author Elizabeth Becker.

Three pioneering women correspondents — Frances FitzGerald, Catherine Leroy and Kate Webb — changed the nature of modern war reporting and even the course of history with their coverage of the Vietnam War, Elizabeth Becker said in an FCC book event.

“They expanded the lens, they looked at the country and the people, they brought a humanity that was missing,” Becker, author of You Don’t Belong Here: How Three Women Rewrote the Story of War, told FCC First Vice President Eric Wishart.

She explained how the three correspondents’ work was different from both previous war reporting and that of their male contemporaries.

In her book, Becker tells the inspiring story of how these three women from very different backgrounds made their own way to Vietnam and overcame sexism and other challenges to become well-respected war correspondents.

No stranger to war having covered the conflict in Cambodia, Becker noted the high mental and emotional costs of reporting in war zones, though she said that the difficult subject matter did not lead to bias in coverage.

“Once you see the pain and the destruction and the horror of war, your motivation is to be more objective, not less,” Becker said.

Watch the full conversation below:

Philippines’ Marawi Siege Offers Lessons on Battling Disinformation and Propaganda

When the Philippines launched the biggest military assault since World War II against Islamic State-linked extremists who seized the southern Philippine city, journalist Carmela Fonbuena, then working for Rappler, dropped into the centre of the action to cover the toll on ordinary citizens.

As the war dragged on for months, she found a parallel disinformation war playing out especially on social media, spreading inaccurate information about government operations or casualties — sowing fear, confusion, or worse, violence. She said false news can spread like wildfire because people “are so desperate for any information.”

“If we don’t fact-check information that’s spreading on the ground, that’s what people will believe if no one corrects it,” she told the FCC in a forum about her latest book Marawi Siege: Stories From the Front Lines.

“That to me highlights [journalists’] very important role in delivering important information during a crisis, whether it’s the Marawi siege or the coronavirus pandemic,” she said in a discussion moderated by FCC Correspondent Governor Kristine Servando.

And when reporters become targets of online harassment by individuals who disagree with facts on the ground, Fonbuena says it is important to build an emotional support network around oneself — and to avoid trolls. “I would rather spend time writing stories that more people will read than engage with a single individual who won’t be convinced,” she said.

View the rest of the video below, where she talked about lessons on how extremism spreads, war’s invisible toll on mental health, and the role of women in the front lines. Her book Marawi Siege can be ordered from [email protected] and shipped internationally.

 

The FCC Marks International Women’s Day

The Foreign Correspondents’ Club, Hong Kong is marking International Women’s Day, offering events all month long to honour this year’s theme — announced by the United Nations — of “Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a Covid-19 world.”

We’re kicking off with back-to-back talks on March 8 and 9 about women covering war in the Philippines and Vietnam, shattering stereotypes and overcoming cultural barriers in their wake.

And throughout Monday, we’ll be toasting to our vibrant female members with special drinks and canapes.

For the rest of March, hear from more female newsmakers and experts about pressing issues around the world, including where the #MeToo movement stands and how to handle pandemic misinformation. We’ll be updating our speakers’ series page as more guests are confirmed: www.fcchk.org/speakers-upcoming/.

Through outreach activities, the club also seeks to empower women across all sectors of society. In January, we hosted a personal finance workshop for Hong Kong’s migrant domestic workers, who are facing unprecedented pressures during the pandemic.

Beyond events, the FCC is mentoring promising female journalists through the Claire Hollingworth fellowship, which is now in its second year. Hollingworth, who was a club member for 40 years, led a trailblazing war-correspondent career that took her to Europe, North Africa and Asia. She is best known for the scoop of the century, breaking the story of Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939 while working for the Daily Telegraph.

Governments, journalists share responsibility for combating vaccine misinformation


FCC First Vice President Eric Wishart left) and First Draft APAC Bureau Editor Esther Chan (right)

Governments and journalists both have a role to play in combating the spread of COVID-19 vaccine-related misinformation, First Draft APAC Bureau Editor Esther Chan said In a virtual workshop hosted by the FCC, Hong Kong. With vaccination campaigns picking up speed around the world, Chan said that vaccination campaigns and misinformation go hand in hand.  “With vaccine rollout, misinformation also starts to proliferate online, and it can be because of a number of reasons: limited data about the vaccines, lack of confidence in its efficacy or even a lack of trust in the government,” she said. Chan began her presentation with a real-world example of a conspiracy theory that recently went viral in Hong Kong — that Chief Executive Carrie Lam and other government ministers did not in fact receive the Sinovac vaccine as they said, but rather the jab produced by Pfizer-BioNTech or AstraZeneca.  The basis for this rumour rested on the fact that the syringe used to administer the vaccine to Lam was longer and thinner than those that had been depicted in previous news coverage of the Sinovac jab.  “Even though this claim was unproven, it quickly went viral online,” Chan said. The Hong Kong government later confirmed that Lam and other officials had received the Sinovac vaccine, while pointing out that neither the Pfizer-BioNTech nor AstraZeneca jabs had arrived in the city yet.  An opinion poll conducted by the University of Hong Kong at the end of January showed that less than a third of the city’s residents trusted the Sinovac vaccine. In December, Lam had responded to speculation over the reasons for her government’s decision to buy 7.5 million doses of Sinovac by saying “some people with ulterior motives were spreading malicious rumours and publishing false information that stigmatises and politicises the vaccine purchase”. Attacking critics of the government’s vaccine policy was not the most constructive approach, Chan said in the workshop moderated by FCC First Vice President Eric Wishart. “How Carrie Lam described people who were critical of the Sinovac vaccine, that’s really not helpful because there’s already maybe an issue of trust in the Hong Kong government,” she said.  “It should really be an objective discussion instead of mixing politics in, so I feel like the government messaging is not really helping with the vaccine hesitancy in Hong Kong.” Similarly, she shared advice for journalists who are tasked with covering vaccine rollouts and misinformation. “When you notice something that is shaping how people think about an important issue like public health, you probably should address it but in a really careful way,” Chan said.  “Back it up with a lot of important scientific data that people really should know. Lead them from focusing on a rumour back to the facts.” The workshop also focused on social media’s role in spreading vaccine misinformation, which commonly follows narratives with six different themes. While Facebook and Twitter are often considered the primary platforms for spreading misinformation, Chan explained that Instagram also plays a significant role and is often overlooked because it’s harder to search for specific content on the visual-driven platform. For journalists and anyone else seeking resources about COVID-19 vaccine misinformation, Chan recommended using First Draft as an educational tool. The organisation offers an online Vaccine Insights Hub where you can sign up to watch 30-minute workshops — including a special recap session on Friday, March 5 — and receive a weekly newsletter. First Draft also offers an extensive free library of training materials to support journalists and members of the public in understanding and managing all types of disinformation. Watch the full workshop below:

 

FCC Restrictions Remain In Place

FCC Restrictions Remain In Place
 
Dear Members:
 
The Hong Kong government is extending its anti-virus restrictions through March 17. As a result, all the recent club measures will remain unchanged as follows:
 
Four people will be allowed at tables in all outlets and the number of guests per member is now extended to three.
All restaurants will close at 10 p.m. every day. Last orders for food will be 9 p.m. while last orders for drinks will be 9:30 p.m. Any food or drink should not be consumed in areas adjacent to the FCC after 10 p.m.
The takeaway menu is available from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., though last orders must be made by 9 p.m. The menu can be downloaded from our website at fcchk.org. Please place orders with the FCC Restaurant at 2844 2806 or [email protected]. Orders will be confirmed by a phone call.
The gym will reopen yet the sauna and steam room remain closed. No more than four people are allowed at a time. Wearing a mask while exercising is no longer required in the gym. Please pre-register with the gym attendant at 2844 2849.
Banqueting will continue except for cocktail parties, and distancing and mask-wearing while not eating or drinking are being enforced. The number of participants per event is limited to 20, with four to a table until 10 p.m. Please contact the banquet team at 2844 2838 or [email protected] to book.
Live performances are suspended.
All outlets are restricted to 50% capacity. Please book ahead.
The workroom is open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Be reminded that wearing a mask is required and phone or video meeting is not allowed.
All member and guest are required to scan the “LeaveHomeSafe” venue QR code displayed at the entrance of the club with their mobile phones, or register the personal details, and date of visit and time at the front desk when checking in.
   
In keeping with government requirements and best practices, all members, guests and staff must wear face masks except when eating or drinking. Hand sanitizer must be used. The FCC will continue the temperature-taking and declaration measures upon entry to the club, as well as the frequent cleaning protocols throughout the building. Please inform the staff if you are concerned that any of the rules are not being followed.
 
People who have traveled overseas in the past 21 days are not allowed to visit the club.
 
Thank you for your continued support of the FCC.
4 March 2021

 
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