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2022 HUMAN RIGHTS PRESS AWARDS: Now Open for Entries

Update: The Human Rights Press Awards have been suspended.


               
2022 HUMAN RIGHTS PRESS AWARDS
Now Open for Entries
(Scroll down for Chinese version)
                      

We are delighted to announce that the Human Rights Press Awards, Asia’s most prestigious honours that recognise outstanding human rights reporting, have returned and are now open for entries. The deadline is February 1, 2022 (11:59 PM, HKT).

The Human Rights Press Awards, now in their 26th year, are organised by the Foreign Correspondents’ Club Hong Kong.

Showcasing this work has become more important than ever as governments around the region step up threats to basic freedoms since the pandemic broke out. This has ranged from locking up journalists, carrying out arbitrary detentions to silencing political opponents.

Submissions must have been reporting about the Asia region and been published or broadcast during the 2021 calendar year. Entries must be in either English or Chinese.

Categories include Breaking News, Feature, Multimedia, Video and Photography. Please go to the website for more details.

Each entry must cite the article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that the work seeks to address. This landmark document sets out the inalienable rights to which every person is entitled. The full text is available here: https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html

Please mark your calendars and be ready to submit your work!

The online entry form will be open on January 1, 2022 at:
https://humanrightspress.awardsplatform.com/

For further information, please visit:
https://humanrightspressawards.org

And follow us on:
Twitter https://twitter.com/HRPressAwards
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HumanRightsPA

For queries, please contact the awards administrator:

Telegram: https://t.me/iHRPA
Email: [email protected]

                


               
二零二二年人權新聞獎
現正接受報名
   

亞洲矚目的新聞界盛事、二零二二年人權新聞獎於2022年1月1日起接受報名,誠邀新聞工作者踴躍參與,截止日期為2022年2月1日(香港時間23:59)。

人權新聞獎由香港外國記者會主辦,以表彰亞洲區的卓越人權新聞報道,今年已是第二十六屆。獎項旨在增加公眾對人類基本權利尊重,並令大眾關注任何對這些權利之威脅。

自新冠疫情爆發以來,區內多個政府對基本人權自由之侵害不斷加劇,以防控疫情為由打壓言論自由、集會自由等事件時有發生,令舉辦此獎項更顯重要。

參選作品必須為亞洲區的人權議題採訪報道,並於二零二一年內刊出或公開播放。參賽作品須以中文或英文提交,今屆參賽類別包括:突發新聞、特寫、多媒體、錄像及攝影。詳情請瀏覽人權新聞獎官方網站。

參加者必須註明參選作品與《世界人權宣言》中哪一條人權宣言相關。《世界人權宣言》全文:https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html

網上報名平台地址:
https://humanrightspress.awardsplatform.com/

有關比賽詳情請瀏覽新聞獎官方網站:
https://humanrightspressawards.org

亦可追蹤我們的社交平台以獲得最新資訊:
推特: https://twitter.com/HRPressAwards
臉書: https://www.facebook.com/HumanRightsPA

如有查詢,請聯絡新聞獎秘書處:

Telegram: https://t.me/iHRPA
電郵:[email protected]



Mandatory use of “LeaveHomeSafe” app in the Club premise

    
      
Dear Fellow Members,

You may be aware that the Government has announced an update of mandatory use of the “LeaveHomeSafe” mobile application to all premises with effect from December 9.

Members and their guests must scan the “LeaveHomeSafe” QR code before entering the Club including health club and workroom. Only the following three groups of persons have the option to either use the “LeaveHomeSafe” apps or complete a form:
  1. Persons aged 65 or above and aged 15 or below;
  2. Persons with disability; and
  3. Other persons recognized by the Government or organization(s) authorized by the Government
Please be aware that use of the “LeaveHomeSafe” app is a government requirement, and anyone not using it faces a $5000 fine. There is no exception for not having a smartphone. The only exception is for visitors under the age of 16, and those 65 or older, who will be allowed fill out a form. Individuals – that is, members and their guests – bear responsibility for using the app.  In case of an inspection and a fine being issued, the Club is not responsible.

I would like to thank all of you for your continued support and willingness to adapt to these varying restrictions and regulations. And I will of course be in touch if anything changes as we monitor the situation and follow the government’s announcements.

Merry Christmas and I look forward to seeing you around the Main Bar.


Keith Richburg

President

9 December 2021

FCC Update on Tighter Restrictions Starting Jan 7

FCC Update on Tighter Restrictions Starting Jan 7
      
Dear Members:
As the Hong Kong government has imposed further restrictions from Jan 7-Jan 20 in view of the COVID-19 situation in Hong Kong, the FCC is required to make some changes to our operations starting on Friday morning, Jan 7. The club will remain open but with the following restrictions:
All restaurants will close at 6 p.m. every day. Last food orders must be made by 5 p.m. and last drinks orders by 5:30 p.m.
The takeaway menu will still be available from 11 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. The menu can be downloaded from our website at fcchk.org. Please place orders with the FCC Restaurant at 2844 2806 or [email protected]. All orders will be confirmed by a phone call.
The FCC will continue to restrict guests to three per member at all times. No more than 4 persons will be allowed at tables in all outlets. All outlets will remain at 75% capacity.
For all club or private events operated under Type D, the FCC will continue to follow all the government restrictions, including the requirement that at least two-thirds of the total number of participants must have received the first vaccine jab and show proof (through a QR code or on paper), and a limit of 6 persons per table.
Club luncheon talks will continue as scheduled, but according to the above restrictions (6 per table and two-thirds showing proof of first vaccination).
No live or music performances will be held at this time.
The gym will be closed.
               
Members and their guests must scan the “LeaveHomeSafe” QR code before entering the Club including the workroom. Only the specific three groups of persons have the option to either use the “LeaveHomeSafe” apps or complete a form.
Please be aware that use of the “LeaveHomeSafe” app is a government requirement, and anyone not using it faces a $5000 fine. There is no exception for not having a smartphone or forgetting your smartphone. In case of an inspection and a fine being issued, the Club is not responsible.
We are sorry we have to adhere to these new restrictions, just as the Club was regaining its old verve and rhythm. We hope these restrictions are short term and we want everyone to stay safe and healthy.
Thank you for your continued support of the FCC.
6 January 2022

FCC Restrictions Continue To Remain In Place

FCC Restrictions Continue To Remain In Place
      
Dear Members:
The Hong Kong Government has announced that the current restriction measures will remain in effect until February 17, the FCC restrictions will continue to remain in place with the following:
All restaurants closes at 6 p.m. every day. Last food orders must be made by 5 p.m. and last drinks orders by 5:30 p.m. See our Chinese New Year operating hours at https://www.fcchk.org/event/2022-chinese-new-year-opening-hours/
The takeaway menu is available from 11 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. (but until 5:30 p.m. on Jan 31 Chinese New Year’s Eve). The menu can be downloaded from our website at fcchk.org. Please place orders with the FCC Restaurant at 2844 2806 or [email protected]. All orders will be confirmed by a phone call.
The FCC continues to restrict guests to three per member at all times. No more than 4 persons will be allowed at tables in all outlets. All outlets will remain at 75% capacity.
For all club or private events operated under Type D, the FCC will continue to follow all the government restrictions, including the requirement that at least two-thirds of the total number of participants must have received the first vaccine jab and show proof (through a QR code or on paper), and a limit of 6 persons per table.
Club luncheon talks will continue as scheduled, but according to the above restrictions (6 per table and two-thirds showing proof of first vaccination).
No music performances will be held at this time.
The gym is closed.
All persons must wear a face mask at all times within Club premises, except when eating or drinking at the table.
               
Members and their guests must scan the “LeaveHomeSafe” QR code before entering the Club including the workroom. Only the specific three groups of persons have the option to either use the “LeaveHomeSafe” apps or complete a form.
Please be aware that use of the “LeaveHomeSafe” app is a government requirement, and anyone not using it faces a $5000 fine. There is no exception for not having a smartphone or forgetting your smartphone. In case of an inspection and a fine being issued, the Club is not responsible.
The Government is going to expand the “Vaccine Bubble” starting from Feb 24 or before, meaning that all member and guest above aged 12 must receive at least the 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine unless having a medical certificate. The effective date may change subject to the latest Government announcement.
Thank you for your continued support of the FCC. Please take care, stay safe and healthy.
Kung Hei Fat Choy!
29 January 2022

FCC Restrictions Continue To Remain In Place

FCC Restrictions Continue To Remain In Place
      
Dear Members:
The Hong Kong Government has announced that the current restriction measures will remain in effect until February 3, the FCC restrictions will continue to remain in place with the following:
All restaurants closes at 6 p.m. every day. Last food orders must be made by 5 p.m. and last drinks orders by 5:30 p.m. See our Chinese New Year operating hours at https://www.fcchk.org/event/2022-chinese-new-year-opening-hours/
The takeaway menu is available from 11 a.m. until 9:30 p.m. (but until 5:30 p.m. on Jan 31 Chinese New Year’s Eve). The menu can be downloaded from our website at fcchk.org. Please place orders with the FCC Restaurant at 2844 2806 or [email protected]. All orders will be confirmed by a phone call.
The FCC continues to restrict guests to three per member at all times. No more than 4 persons will be allowed at tables in all outlets. All outlets will remain at 75% capacity.
For all club or private events operated under Type D, the FCC will continue to follow all the government restrictions, including the requirement that at least two-thirds of the total number of participants must have received the first vaccine jab and show proof (through a QR code or on paper), and a limit of 6 persons per table.
Club luncheon talks will continue as scheduled, but according to the above restrictions (6 per table and two-thirds showing proof of first vaccination).
No music performances will be held at this time.
The gym is closed.
All persons must wear a face mask at all times within Club premises, except when eating or drinking at the table.
               
Members and their guests must scan the “LeaveHomeSafe” QR code before entering the Club including the workroom. Only the specific three groups of persons have the option to either use the “LeaveHomeSafe” apps or complete a form.
Please be aware that use of the “LeaveHomeSafe” app is a government requirement, and anyone not using it faces a $5000 fine. There is no exception for not having a smartphone or forgetting your smartphone. In case of an inspection and a fine being issued, the Club is not responsible.
You may also aware that the Government is going to expand the “Vaccine Bubble” starting from Feb 24 or before, meaning that all member and guest above aged 12 must receive at least the 1st dose of COVID-19 vaccine unless having a medical certificate. The effective date may change subject to the latest Government announcement.
Thank you for your continued support of the FCC. Please take care, stay safe and healthy.
21 January 2022

Concerns Rising Over Weakening Media Freedoms in Hong Kong, FCC Press Freedom Survey Shows

    
Concerns Rising Over Weakening Media Freedoms in
Hong Kong, FCC Press Freedom Survey Shows
      

Journalists and correspondents in Hong Kong say working conditions have deteriorated significantly since the introduction of the National Security Law, while large numbers report growing concern about the possibility of a “fake news” law that could further erode press freedoms in the city, according to a new survey from the Foreign Correspondents’ Club, Hong Kong.

In a wide-ranging survey of the FCC’s correspondent and journalist members, 84% of respondents said the working environment for journalism has “changed for the worse” since the law’s introduction in June 2020.

At the same time, 91% of respondents said they were either “very concerned” (76%) or “slightly concerned” (15%) about the possible introduction of a fake news law.

Concern has been heightened by the fact that, since the enactment of the National Security Law, there has been a drastic decline in the willingness of sources to be quoted–86% of respondents said their sources were less willing to be quoted or to discuss sensitive subjects, and there is concern that even relatively neutral topics might be deemed “a bit political.”

It has become very difficult for journalists to tell what is a sensitive topic: Only about half (52%) of respondents said they had a clear sense of where the government’s “red lines” were now. Moreover, respondents gave a wide range of definitions of “sensitive” and several noted that this definition could change at any time.

Most respondents (56%) said they had, to some degree, self-censored or avoided reporting on what might be considered sensitive stories. Others had deleted images out of security concerns, and there is widespread concern among journalists over digital and physical surveillance. Nearly half of the respondents (46%) said they were now considering or already had plans to leave Hong Kong because of the decline in press freedom in the city.

“These results clearly show that assurances that Hong Kong still enjoys press freedom, guaranteed under the Basic Law, are not enough,” FCC President Keith Richburg said. “More steps need to be taken to restore confidence among journalists and to make sure Hong Kong maintains its decades-long reputation as a welcoming place for the international media.”

Amid the uncertain working environment for reporters in Hong Kong, respondents noted that fake news laws have been created by authoritarian governments around the world to suppress unfavourable coverage. And there are already signs that the Hong Kong government and the police could label unfavourable coverage as “fake news”, as detailed in the FCC’s open letter on 22 April to then-Police Commissioner Chris Tang.

The FCC urges the Hong Kong government to heed the concerns of our members and take action to restore confidence among working journalists in the city. We ask the government to consider very carefully the impact a “fake news” law would have not only on the media here but also on Hong Kong’s international reputation for press freedom.

The FCC’s membership includes reporters and editors from major media outlets around the world, and from across Hong Kong’s diverse media landscape. Read the full FCC survey report here.

Contact: [email protected]


The Foreign Correspondents’ Club, Hong Kong, Membership Survey on Press Freedom

In an effort to gauge the confidence of our members in the media environment in Hong Kong since the introduction of the National Security Law, the Foreign Correspondents’ Club (FCC) has conducted a survey of correspondent and journalist members on a wide range of issues related to press freedom.

The results revealed widespread uncertainty among members over what the media is and is not allowed to report on since the implementation of the National Security Law in June 2020, and concern over the further erosion of press freedom with the possible introduction of a “fake news” law in Hong Kong. 

“This is the first time we’ve conducted a survey like this of our correspondent and journalist members,” FCC President Keith Richburg said. “There’s been a lot of talk and anecdotal evidence about concerns over the state of press freedom in Hong Kong, so we thought it would be helpful to try to quantify the extent of those concerns.”

The vast majority of respondents reported an overall deterioration in the working environment for journalists, noting in particular the unwillingness of sources to be quoted and the need for reporters to self-censor their writing or delete images. 

The survey was conducted from late August to late October 2021. While the FCC has numerous members working in non-media sectors, for this survey we chose only to contact the club’s correspondent and journalist members. We received 99 responses–70 from correspondent members (club members working for foreign media) and 29 from journalist members (those working for local media)–reflecting a response rate of about 25%. All responses were anonymous.

In terms of the general working environment for journalists, 84% said that the situation had deteriorated since the introduction of the National Security Law. While 15% said there had been no change, one respondent said the situation had actually changed for the better. 

One respondent said:

In many ways it has become worse than the mainland because nobody knows what the red lines are and there is real fear that previous coverage could be scrutinised. Self-censorship and the drying up of sources is another result of the NSL.

Another noted:

It has definitely changed for the worse. When I first arrived, Hong Kong was a much freer society — people were open to speaking, no topic within reason was off limits, and there were no real concerns about what we could publish or whether we could protect sources who spoke to us. Now, many people are reluctant or refuse to talk on sensitive subjects, and our organization — especially after the raids on Apple Daily — is much more cautious about data security and the ability to protect sources.

A total of 86% of respondents said sources were now less willing to talk about sensitive issues, while 14% reported no change. One respondent revealed:

Many of my sources are now in jail. Some have fled abroad. Others now refuse to comment to foreign media, based on advice from their lawyers or out of — very justifiable — fear that speaking to a foreign journalist could aid a prosecutor’s case against them under the National Security Law. Many people, even those abroad who might have family in Hong Kong, are now insisting on anonymity. 

Another stated simply:

Fallen off a cliff. Former sources happy to go on the record now are only off the record or won’t talk at all.

However, another respondent countered:

I think sources are still happy to talk. They might say something is a “bit political” when talking but I haven’t noticed people holding back.

A smaller, but still significant, number of members said they were self-censoring or had experienced censorship within their organization. Asked “To what extent have you self-censored your writing, either in content or by simply avoiding covering certain subjects?” 44% replied not at all, 40% said they had slightly self-censored, and 16% had self-censored to a considerable degree. 

One respondent said: 

There are certainly some topics that we would now have to think long and hard about covering in any detail, in particular anything to do with independence. We would also now consider publishing some of our coverage with a non-Hong Kong dateline to avoid potential legal/political jeopardy for colleagues based in the city. But otherwise we soldier on and do our job of reporting the news without fear or favour.

The majority of respondents, 56%, said they had not experienced any overt censorship by their news organization in the coverage of sensitive issues, 36% said they had seen slight censorship, while 8% had experienced considerable censorship. One respondent noted that “management doesn’t ‘officially’ discourage coverage of sensitive areas but makes it very difficult to do so.”

One member pointed out:

Censorship is a loaded word. Clearly, the NSL is something we need to take seriously and it has affected how we approach the news and express our opinions. We don’t want to break the law. At the same time, I don’t feel I have been prevented from saying what I want to about the NSL and about how Hong Kong has changed since its enactment.

One of the most significant results of the survey was the uncertainty among our members over what is and what is not a “sensitive subject” in the wake of the National Security Law. Around half of the respondents, 48%, said they were unclear about exactly where the red lines were in reporting sensitive issues. Other respondents were more confident in defining the red lines but significantly gave different responses: Some highlighted Hong Kong independence, while others focused on mainland China issues or more generally Tibet, Xinjiang and Taiwan. 

To illustrate the uncertainty, one respondent said:

When a nurse said that one of her patients didn’t want to get the Covid vaccine in China because she didn’t think the Chinese vaccines are very good, and decided to come back to Hong Kong where she could get the BioNTech shot, I got an editor’s comment “Do you think this is a bit too political?” 

In terms of sensitive images, 48% of respondents said they were not confident in knowing what is permitted when it comes to taking photos or videos of sensitive subjects, 33% were somewhat confident, and only 19% said they were confident in knowing what images were acceptable:

I have the feeling that journalists are allowed to shoot public events even if they contain banners or slogans that breach the NSL. Likewise, media can publish them. But that can change in a second.

Many respondents agreed that the definition of what is considered sensitive is shifting all the time, thereby forcing them to exercise a greater degree of caution.

The definition of what is sensitive has broadened from the specifically political to encompass the work of civil society, the media, trade union and cultural organizations. There is no indication that this widening process is about to stop.

Going forward, there is widespread concern among the FCC’s correspondent and journalist members over the Hong Kong government’s proposal to enact a “fake news” law. In all, 76% of respondents said they were “very concerned” about the introduction of a fake news law, 15% were slightly concerned, 6% were not aware of the issue, and 3% were not concerned about the legislation. 

Several respondents noted that “fake news” laws have been created by authoritarian governments to suppress unfavourable coverage. Others said there are signs that Hong Kong authorities are willing to label anything they do not like as “fake news.” For example:

It’s already clear to me that officials in high office in Hong Kong believe that “fake news” is a label they can apply to news or commentary that they don’t like, regardless of whether it is “fake,” and that a fake news law could be used broadly against critics in the same way that they have used the National Security Law. 

Other respondents, while noting the risk of abuse by the authorities, cautioned that journalists still had a responsibility to verify information before publication and avoid over-sensationalizing issues.

The media has tremendous responsibilities, and we must be abiding by our code of conduct to stay neutral. Press Freedom does not mean that someone has the freedom to make up stories that are not facts. I am saddened by how the media has deteriorated to become storytellers instead of news reporters

The survey revealed considerable uncertainty among FCC correspondent and journalist members about the future. A significant majority of respondents said they were concerned about the possibility of arrest or prosecution from reporting or writing opinion articles – 61% were slightly concerned, 10% were very concerned, while 29% said they were not concerned about arrest or prosecution. 

I’ve published extensively and it’s ‘out there’ on the net. But with laws constantly changing and applying to old works and deeds, if someone needs a flimsy excuse to ‘get me’, they’ll probably pull up some old work that was acceptable debate/opinion when it was published and now an excuse to prosecute. 

A total of 77% of respondents said they were concerned about the possibility of digital or physical surveillance, while another 12% said they had already directly experienced surveillance. 37% of respondents had deleted images, either online or one their devices, because of security concerns, and a smaller number of reporters said they had experienced interference, harassment or violence while reporting. 15% had experienced minor interference and 7% said they had encountered significant harassment or interference.

Many correspondent and journalist members have the right to permanent residency in Hong Kong and so are not directly affected by employment visa issues. That said, 29% of respondents reported that they personally, or others in their news organization, had experienced considerable delays or obstacles in obtaining employment visas or visa renewals. Another 24% said they had experienced slight delays.

Finally, we asked members if they were planning on or considering leaving Hong Kong because of concerns over press freedom. About 34% said they were considering leaving, and 12% already had plans to do so. The remaining 54% said they planned to stay. One typical response noted:

The rapidly deteriorating political environment in Hong Kong has made me consider cutting short my stay in the city. While we’re not planning an imminent departure by any means, myself and several others I know are reconsidering previous plans to stay in Hong Kong over a longer time frame, given the city we arrived in was very different than the city we currently live in. Everyone has different limits on what they will tolerate. 

Richburg, the FCC’s president, added: “We would like to conduct this kind of survey on a regular, recurring basis so we can continue to gauge the sentiment among our members who are working actively as journalists and let the results be made publicly available. We hope this survey, and any future ones, can help contribute to the ongoing discussion about the state of press freedom in Hong Kong.”

The FCC is grateful to all those members who took the time to respond to our survey.

2022 HUMAN RIGHTS PRESS AWARDS – Open for Entries on January 1, 2022

Update: The Human Rights Press Awards have been suspended.


               
2022 HUMAN RIGHTS PRESS AWARDS
Open for Entries on January 1, 2022
(Scroll down for Chinese version)
                      
As the world marks Human Rights Day, Asia’s most prestigious awards honouring outstanding human rights reporting is announcing that it will be open for entries from January 1, 2022 to February 1, 2022 (11:59 PM, HKT).
   
The Human Rights Press Awards, now in their 26th year, are organised by the Foreign Correspondents’ Club Hong Kong.
   
Showcasing this work has become more important than ever as governments around the region step up threats to basic freedoms since the pandemic broke out, whether it be locking up journalists, carrying out arbitrary detentions or silencing political opponents.
   
Submissions must have been reported about the Asia region and been published or broadcast during the 2021 calendar year. Entries must be in either English or Chinese.
   
Categories include Breaking News, Feature, Commentary, Multimedia, Video, Audio and Photography. Please go to the website for more details.
   
Each entry must cite the article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that the work seeks to address. This landmark document sets out the inalienable rights to which every person is entitled. The full text is available here: https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html
   
Please mark your calendars and be ready to submit your work!
   
The online entry form will be open on January 1, 2022 at:
https://humanrightspress.awardsplatform.com/
   
For further information, please visit:
http://humanrightspressawards.org
   
And follow us on:
Twitter https://twitter.com/HRPressAwards
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/HumanRightsPA
   
For queries, please contact the awards administrator:
   
Telegram: https://t.me/iHRPA
Email: [email protected]
                



               
二零二二年人權新聞獎
2022年1月1日起接受報名
   
亞洲矚目的新聞界盛事、二零二二年人權新聞獎將於2022年1月1日起接受報名,誠邀新聞工作者踴躍參與,截止日期為2022年2月1日(香港時間23:59)。
   
人權新聞獎由香港外國記者會主辦,以表彰亞洲區的卓越人權新聞報道,今年已是第二十六屆。獎項旨在增加公眾對人類基本權利尊重,並令大眾關注任何對這些權利之威脅。
   
自新冠疫情爆發以來,區內多個政府對基本人權自由之侵害不斷加劇,以防控疫情為由打壓言論自由、集會自由等事件時有發生,令舉辦此獎項更顯重要。
   
參選作品必須為亞洲區的人權議題採訪報道,並於二零二一年內刊出或公開播放。參賽作品須以中文或英文提交,今屆參賽類別包括:突發新聞、特寫、評論、多媒體、錄像、電台廣播和錄音及攝影。詳情請瀏覽人權新聞獎官方網站。
    
參加者必須註明參選作品與《世界人權宣言》中哪一條人權宣言相關。
《世界人權宣言》全文:https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html
   
網上報名平台將於2022年1月1日正式開放:
https://humanrightspress.awardsplatform.com/
   
有關比賽詳情請瀏覽新聞獎官方網站:
http://humanrightspressawards.org
   
亦可追蹤我們的社交平台以獲得最新資訊:
推特: https://twitter.com/HRPressAwards
臉書: https://www.facebook.com/HumanRightsPA
   
   
如有查詢,請聯絡新聞獎秘書處:
   
Telegram: https://t.me/iHRPA
電郵:[email protected]

Visit our new Members’ Area in our FCC Website!

    
      
Dear Members,
     
Since the launch of our newly developed FCC Website www.fcchk.org early this year, the site is now faster loading, more secure and has a mobile version to cater for accessing everything on the site via all smartphones and tablet devices. The website's new features include a scrolling social media feed and easier-to-find archives of our speaker events. It also provides easily accessible and searchable news about the Club, our press freedom statements, and notices about our upcoming luncheon talks and our food and beverage promotions.
    
Now we are delighted to announce that the Members' Area is ready. It enables members to check their account statements and manage their own account. The online booking function and the E-Shop is still being tested and will be released soon, so stay tuned. 
    
To use the Members' Area, you will first need a one-time registration. An introduction on ‘How to register the members’ area’ is attached here. If you have any questions on how to register, feel free to contact the Concierge team at 2521 1511 or [email protected] on weekdays from 0900 to 2100.
    
The unveiling of this site is a culmination of months of work from the tireless staff along with the Board. We are proud of all their contributions and we thank everyone for their efforts. 
    
Let me know what you think — I'll see you at the Main Bar.
    
Cheers,
    
Keith Richburg
President
     
24 September 2021

FCC Minimum Spend

      
Dear Members,
 
With the lifting of many of the restrictions which have limited FCC activities for so long, we have been delighted to welcome back more members to the Club's expanded offering of speaker events, film nights, musical events and our extensive F&B promotions. As a result of the Club being more accessible, the minimum spend requirement will now revert to being charged to Member's accounts on a quarterly basis and hence will be charged to Member's September accounts which will be sent in early October. We will continue to offer the opportunity for Members to purchase vouchers to be used in subsequent months if you are unable to utilise the Club before the end of September.
 
21 September 2021

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